CAM-Chem/DART CO Column We are currently applying an ensemble-based chemical data assimilation system, consisting of regional to global chemical transport models (CAM-Chem, WRF-Chem) in conjunction with DART, for a joint assimilation of meteorological observations and satellite-derived CO measurements from MOPITT and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from MODIS. The chemical data assimilation system has been recently used for near-real time chemical forecasting (see https://espo.nasa.gov/arctas/) to support flight planning during the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS). [link to more information]

Ave Arellano, arellano@ucar.edu



Chemical Data Assimilation with DART

Vertical profile result from CAM

Chemical Weather (CW) Forecasting and Analysis

Program for Atmospheric Composition REmote Sensing & Prediction (ACRESP) (https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/acresp)

In close collaboration with NCAR/IMAGe/DAReS, we are exploring and building a capability for a chemical data assimilation system, as a tool for studies related to chemical weather and regional to global air quality. Such a system is analogous to systems being developed and applied in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) community.

We are currently applying an ensemble-based chemical data assimilation system, consisting of regional to global chemical transport models (CAM-Chem, WRF-Chem) in conjunction with DART, for a joint assimilation of meteorological observations and satellite-derived CO measurements from Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, (MODIS). A prototype of this system has been evaluated using in-situ measurements from NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-B) (Arellano et al. 2007). The chemical data assimilation system has been recently used for near-real time chemical forecasting (see https://espo.nasa.gov/arctas/) to support flight planning during the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS). We are currently evaluating the performance of the new system with the ARCTAS field observations.

In addition, we are using the same chemical data assimilation, to conduct observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) aimed at investigating the utility of a satellite constellation of chemical observations in improving air quality predictions. We are also using this framework in defining the science, measurement and instrument requirements for the NASA Instrument Incubator Program CISR carbon monoxide instrument now being considered as candidate technology for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GeoCAPE) mission ( http://geo-cape.larc.nasa.gov).

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